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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 218 (some duplicates have been removed)
much trouble that yesterday, before yesterday and the whole town of bishara al-assad, there have been demonstrations, should and we understand, one of the cousins has been killed here this is to say nothing. so the family is in very serious trouble. compare this with a year ago and i think that would give us a glimpse into how long the and of the two is going to be. >> i wanted to reinforce the concept of the demonstrations two weeks ago. we recorded more than 540 peaceful demonstrations around the country, that these people continue to go out is a testament to their desire to expedite the fall of the regime. but you also see is one pillar support of the regime has been shaking and they've been shaking faster and faster and will collapse. you will see that in areas like media where we have a significant number of media personalities who are now speaking out. you see that in the business sector. i don't off everybody knows this, but there is a price tag on the heads. a bounty of $25 million for bashar al-assad's head. so all these pillars are shaking faster and faster. i don't think it
on assad head for a bounty of $25 million. so all of these pillars are shaking faster and faster. i don't think it's going to go to next summer. >> the point you raised about the sectarian issue. i think this was one of the cards the regime was relying on and that's why they created sectarian based massacres especially in the western side in syria which is a vulnerable area where you actually have one village, one village. that is syria's existence over hundreds of thousands of years. what happened is the syrian regime tried to break these organic co-existing structures that really mark the region. and the amazing thing is the level of self-restraint the syrian people have shown. the syrian army had access to villages from other sects and they did not engage in sectarian violence. it has been limited. considering the level of brutality and the sectarian sentiments in the country they have shown tremendous unity. anybody would be touched to see the slogans the people raced after a four-day campaign where close to 900 people were massacred. the slogans they carried were that this revoluti
that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute posted the activists who are part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds
council, we know that russia has been supplying hardware for assad. we understand -- we think that the americans are supporting ticket. this is a security council who is doing nothing in this situation. why should anyone believe that the u.n. can fix things? >> you are right that the divisions in the council make a solution difficult. that was one of the reasons i resigned, as you know, but the challenge is to overcome those divisions and get them working -- i tried. at the beginning, they came together, but it was not sustained. if the security council is not made to come together, then we are in a really hopeless situation. >> and syria will descend further into war? >> it could get worse. it could get much worse. how do we solve the problem? militarization or intervention, in my judgment, will make the situation much worse. >> what do you foresee happening? >> i think the neighbors will be drawn in. already, we have seen thousands of refugees fleeing to jordan, lebanon, turkey, iraq. she hottest elements are coming in across the border -- jihadist elements are coming in acr
in the middle east and a message to president assad to as turkey authorizes military action inside syria. >> this is not a mandate to wage war. it is so we can't prepare new development and protect our interests there. we are not declaring war on syria. >> mitt romney relaunched -- why the republicans are claiming victory at last night's u.s. presidential debate. >> coat ♪ >> love them, we do. 50 years ago today, the beatles released their first ever single. we look at how it holds up. decker packwood cause >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america to the problem. the turkish prime minister said today he had no intention of starting a war with syria. but the message is mixed and the tensions are high. the turkish parliament authorize military action against neighbor after syrian shells landed in the turkish town killing five civilians. >> lot this was not turkey's war, but the deaths of one family next to the syrian border have changed kuwait this country sees its neighbors conflicts. the government has called the strike from syria a final straw. left of the isn't family hoped. -- th
artillery fighting between turkey and syria. yesterday syrian activists predict that the assad regime will fall. this was held by the u.s. institute of peace, and it is close to two hours. >> good morning. in jim marshall, the new president of the institute of peace, which i am delighted to tell you, and i am pleased everyone is here for an import -- to hear about and the port project that has been sponsored by the institute for peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he has directed the center for democracy and civil studies -- civil society at georgetown. he -- he is a terrific asset for the institute. this project is driven by syrians, with technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and a sister institute in germany. it is important these efforts are driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states did not work all that well. we are pleased that you are here. i hope you have lots of questions, and if i can turn this over to you -- >> thank you para much, and let me add my welcome to you. we are delighted to see you her
is deeply hostile to president assad and says that syria must be held to account. they are urging nato allies to help. >> the a very very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> this is exactly what many people feared, the conflict spreading and flaming an already divided region. turkey backed the rebels, lightly armed, but without clear that ship. they have taken ground from a substantial army backed by iran in particular. president assad no longer controls his country, but equally he has not lost it. the longer the syrian deadlock, the greater the risk to its neighbors and the region will get sucked into confrontation. >> you will see this proxy conflict boiling over. you need some kind of international momentum to form a consensus that action can shift the ground away from conflict. >> note and to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television is that this does result of unbearable bombings and a lot of today. -- no end to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television said that this is the resul
at the moment in the middle east. there is a belief that a lot of the assad military are using weapons they've got from iran. is that true? and how long will you continue to support assad given the appalling conditions, the humanitarian catastrophe that we are all watching? at what point do you, the president of iran, say enough of this violence? >> translator: i do believe that we must all say enough of this violence right now. six months ago, i said enough of this violence. our opinion, vis-a-vis the issue of syria and other nations, is completely clear. we do believe that freedom, the right to choose, the right to vote, respect and justice is the fundamental right of all people. all people must obtain these rights. no one has the right to restrict a people and nation, but we believe as a friend of nations, we must help the nations around the world to obtain these rights through peaceful paths, through peaceful actions, and we have worked hard. i am now hard at work to organize a contact group in order to bring the two sides into a point of national agreement. >> mr. president, do you con
is a really difficult proposition. and it's a complex to society. when mr. assad goes as i believe eventually he will, what takes its place. how do we do that? these are complicated things. i don't know enough about-- when every one of these things is going on, gi out of my way not to talk to hillary about it so i don't have any information i shouldn't have so i don't inadvertently say something to you that i shouldn't say. so i don't know what their options are. but i think that if we have some nonlethal options that we could use to support the syrian opposition, i presume we would be doing it. and i wouldn't be surprised if we are. i think most people believe that assad is going to have to go. it's sooner or later he will. and their concern about whether-- whatever arrangements that succeeds him can preserve a secular state can preserve a state which gives women a commendable amount of opportunities when compared with the competition in the region, you know, and but is less oppressive, less repressive and less subject to the siren song of the iranians and hezbollah and other forces that pro
becomes, can bashar al-assad handle fighting from in his country the rebels as well as outside of his country from turkey? that could be enough to crush the regime? >>guest: there is is no doubt bashar al-assad wants to keep turkey out of this. that is why we see not just syria apologizing but the russians who are the main diplomatic protector coming in and trying to contain this situation. what you see from the west, also, frankly, is a desire to contain the actual spillover here, the fighting here, and move this into the united nations security council to try to take advantage of this, to spur action in the council. >>trace: you use the word "contain" and that brings the next question. are you concerned this could become a regional war and spread in what really is a very unsettled part of world? >>guest: well, it is already more regionalized than people realize. you have this strike in turkey. it is not the first strike in turkey. we have seen strikes in lebanon. there have been a flow of refugees? jordan and turkey. we have iranian forces and ed in the fighting. as time goes on we
, or give us anti-aircraft weapons, the war would be over in two or three days. and so would assad's regime. you have a message for president assad? "my message is clear," he said, "surrender now. he killed our children and destroyed our homes. we will not allow him to lead syria." if nothing stops this war, the u.n. estimates that as many as 700,000 syrians will have fled to neighboring countries by the end of this year. and there is growing concern the violence could trigger further sectarian conflict, and widen a fault line in the region, already at the brink. brian? >> ann curry after a dicey day of reporting in syria today. and our thanks to our team on the ground from across the region tonight. ann curry, richard engel and lester holt. thank you all. we'll have much more of their reporting on our website tonight, nbcnightlynews.com. when our broadcast continues, emergency landings, loose seats, late flights. what's going on at american airlines these days? >>> and later a woman making a difference for young girls who don't have another home to go home to. tom costello. >> reporter: mo
as a popular uprising against the assad dictatorship which has ruled syria 42 years. one of the most experienced war correspondents covering the civil war in syria is our clarissa ward. she's recently returned from aleppo and joins us now at the broadcast center in new york. clarissa, what can you tell us about who might have been behind these bombings today? >> reporter: well, scott, so far no group has actually claimed responsibility for today's attacks, but there is no doubt that there is an increasing number of extremist groups operating on the ground in syria. they're using the same kind of terrorist tactics that we've seen in iraq and afghanistan and part of the reason for that is this influx of foreign fighters that we've seen into the country. our crew actually spent time in a safe house on the border of turkey that was filled with fighters who had come from northern africa, from other countries, and they said they had come to syria to fight jihad. >> pelley: this civil war which began about 18 months ago to overthrow the dictatorship was in those days all about democracy and
. in the syrian capital damascus, aresident bashar al-assad made a cere public appearance, laying a wreath to the mark of anniversary of the 1973 war against israel. sresident assad's regime is fighting for the survival, and it's unlikely that he wants to antagonize a powerful neighbor like turkey. but the bloody chaos that's cost housanf thousands of lives inside syria, now threatens to entangle other countries, even if they don't really want to fight. holly williams, cbs news, istanbul, turkey. gh axelrod: now to afghanistan where two u.s. soldiers were .illed today by insurgents. it happened in the eastern section of the country that's seen heavy fighting in recent months. tomorrow marks the 11th anniversary of the start of the fghan war. coming up, a vatican insider nvicteted. stay with us. >> axelrod: at the vatican the verdict is in-- the pope's butler did it, found guilty of stealing papers from his boss and leaking them to the press. alan pizzey has been following intrigueigue. o reporter: paolo gabriele's record of seven years of alithful service as the papal ogyler and his apolog
the officials loyal to president bashar al-assad. they renewed it last week to gain control with aleppo. a free syrian army spokesperson says the assad regime mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. he says rebel fighters plan to carry out simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> citizens upset by iran's plummeting currency have taken to the streets of the capital tehran. their protests highlight their growing frustration with the government. protesters fought with riot police in the city's main bazaar. they were demanding the government stop the fall of the rial. demonstrators staged another protest in a different area of the city. iran's currency has lost 70% of the value in the past year and hit record lows against the dollar. u.s. and european sanctions targeting iran are hurting the economy. anti-government protests are unusual in iran. an exchanger at the bazaar said the demonstrators were merchants. >> there have been no reports of injuries, but many shops are closed in and around the bazaar. security officers are patrolling the area. >>> japan's foreign minister
's a very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease-fire. >> reporter: parts of the syrian city of lipo laid in rubles. syrian state tv said three suicide bombers detonated cars packed with explosives killing 34 people. three blasts went off within minutes of each other near military officer's club pap fourth struck near the chamber of commerce. the city has become one of the biggest battlegrounds in the 18 month fight between rebels and government forces. syria's parliament condemned the bombings referring to the rebels as terrorists trying to out of president bashir al assad. lipo has seen intense fighting but been rarely the target of suicide attacks. the kploegs triggered panic among some residents who just want the conflict to end. >> it's been three weeks since the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya was attacked. four americans were killed. there are questions and criticism of the u.s. response to the attack. congress is opening its own investigation. at the state department margaret brennan reports secretary clint
assad's tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> that takes some talking. the former nato sprum allied commander is supporting the campaign and to the right is kristen silverberg, am bass tor to the union. before today, mitt romney had not specifically called for arming the rebels and this country is really not too keen on it and nor are they too opposed, it seems. if you look at it, 48% favor doing so. 47% oppose doing so, but this is new from mitt romney. but how are we supposed to know who the good guys are, who the bad guys are and is he suggesting for a moment that america send the guns? >> no, what governor romney outline ed today was a plan to work with the region, turkey, the saudis, to make sure they have a weapons they need. the two things we hear, first from the opposition groups themselves, that they don't have the weapons they need to overthrow assad and second from our partners in the region, that they feel constrained by u.s. policy from doing things to support the rebels. and that's really a disaster for us. one because we're allowing a slaughter to continue. 30,000 civ
's a very, very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> reporter: parts of the syrian city lay in rubble following four explosions. syrian state tv says three sue a side bombers -- suicide bombers detonated cars. packed with explosives. they went off within minutes of each other near a military officers club. the city has become one of the biggest battlegrounds in the 18- month fight between rebels and government forces. serious parliament -- syria's parliament condemned the bombs as terrorists trying to oust president assad. the explosions triggered panic among some residents who just want the conflict to end. vinita nair for cbs news. >> president assad reportedly visited ahelp poe on tuesday to get a firsthand look at the fighting. he has ordered 30,000 more troops into that battle. >>> here's a look at some other things making news now at 4:37. teachers in chicago have approved a new three-year contract. it includes pay increases and a new evaluation system. the chicago board of education is expected to
to operate against syria. the turkish government has taken a very strong position against assad and calling for him to leave and accusing him of terrible deeds. so, yes, but it's not in the interest of the syrians to provoke the turks. the turkish army is fairly strong and the syrians are already having trouble fighting the free syrian army why bring in another enemy? >> pelley: hisham melhem, you see it that way to? >> the syrians said they are investigating the accident but obviously we don't know if t exact circumstances. logically one would say assad can't provoke the turks because the turkish army is strong and they can take out the syrian army which is already exhausted. at the same time there are those who would argue that it's in the interest of syria to force the turks to play their hand and even the threat of a regional conflagration could force the international powers, the russians, the iranians, others to push the turks not to help the syrian opposition as we talk now we can talk about a regional conflict albeit on a limited basis. we know iranians are sending technicians, trai
activist today predicted that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute of peace hosted the activist who were part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say is being used by the opposition in areas no longer under assad's control. it's under two hours. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i'm jim marshall the new president of the substitute of peace. i'm delighted to tell you. and i'm also pleased that everyone is here today for a very important -- to hear about a important project that has been sponsored. my job is to introduce steven heydemann. steve is the senior adviser for middle east initiative. he taught at colombia. he is published and directed if the senator for democracy and civil society at georgetown university. steve is terrific asset to the institute. the project is one that it driven by syrians. with assistance technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute in a sister constitution in germany. it's very important that these kinds of efforts be driven
. it's working with the arab league to identify people to help force assad out of power a year after president obama said, we want assad out of power. he has substantive things to talk about on the debate stage when they debate foreign policy in two weeks and that ad is now irrelevant. >> don't you think this is a case of him saying, i'll do the things the president is trying to do but do them more effectively? >> there's a fair case to make and there's an opening for that. >> i agree. i'm not saying that's a bad thing. >> there's an opening the size of a pin drop. he didn't lay out his strategy for peace in israel. on iran, the best he could come up with was, i'm going to get tougher on iran because i'm going to have tougher sanctions. >> when barack obama came to office, he said, i'm not george w. bush, so therefore, i can negotiate with iran. >> he said he would open up all doors but he wasn't going to give you a seat at the table unless you wanted to come and talk peace. >> we have unsolicited advice on the other side of the break including helpful hints for donald trump. stay wi
the hole in the middle of this is what is a post as sad, assad syria going to look at, what is the political and security order of a post assad era on? >> you has mosni on the panel you need to get egypt, iran and others aund the tab. >> it seems me he is right, basically, because all of those four countries have got a buying interest and we have interests as well, so i think we -- >> you don't mind the idea of iran being part of that and saudi arabia? >> they already are a part of it. >> they have dealt themselves in but in a negative way. >> but the united states has not bought into that idea. >> it is very difficult and if you are saying to me what is going to be the thing that in the end find a way through, i haven't yet seen a military plan that has said to me, yes this is a way of protectin ose people. and -- but the threat from the minister in my time said the definition of foreign policy is stopping people from killing each other and i am not seeing governance or intelligence i have not seen an intervention plan that could in the least bit work. >> i am not arguing e
going from both sides. as president bashar al-assad syrian troops launched another attack on the rebels in the northern part of his country. there is a heavy turkish military presence this. clearly, the artillery has been given the grown light to fired. it is a dangerous dynamic and we could have a regional war. turkey is part of nato, so turkey could invoke the collective defense clause of that treaty and it would draw on the united states and other western allies to recollect and defend turkey if it gets into a war with syria. the other dynamic, the syrian rebels need help. it could be a point that syrian rebels launch shells at turkey to try and start a war that obviously they would get a lost help from going up against the common enemy, president bashar al-assad. >>trace: and the syrian rebel, how are they doing? >>guest: they have not been doing great but this week they did get some good news in an unusual victory. they took over a syrian air defense space which means they got the missiles inside that base, and if they can figure out how to use the missiles against president bashar
, and children have been massacred by the assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked. the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda, pakistan, afghanistan, including the killing of osama bin laden. these are real achievements one at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force, however, in yemen and somalia, libya, other parts of north africa, iraq, and now in syria, and other extremists have been ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight, but are no substitute for national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding. i want to believe him as much as anyone se. but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region, and with a violent extremists on the march, and with an american ambass
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 218 (some duplicates have been removed)

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